people

andruid kerne
Associate Professor, Computer Science
Director, Interface Ecology Lab
andruid cse.tamu.edu, 979.845.0024, richardson 901d
C.V.

I am a research scientist-artist investigating how people experience personal expression, creative ideation, and social engagement. I develop and evaluate expressive interfaces, computational architectures, and distributed systems that support creative processes of knowledge production and interpersonal communication. Essential research areas are human computer interaction, knowledge management, digital libraries, information visualization, gaming, wearable physiological computing, sensor networks, pervasive computing, embedded systems, and software engineering. Intersecting fields include pattern recognition, information retrieval, cognitive psychology, visual and interaction design, time-based media, ethnography, performance studies, music composition, and conceptual art.

I intend to create provocative dynamics of thought, emotion, and participation in and around information environments, tools, installations, and performances. I work to open the range of expressive, creative, and social processes embodied by computational artifacts, developing interactivity in terms beyond efficiency: discovery, play, contemplation, delight, and satisfaction.

My research is grounded in interface ecology. The interface ecosystems metaframework connects theory and practice to construct the interface as a border zone between heterogeneous systems of representation: personal and machinic, physical and electronic, analog and digital, media and metholodogies. Forms and processes are transformed by the investigation of new connections between these systems. Fields of systematic language are transformed by the interjection of personal expressive forms. A needs requirement is reframed as an expression of desire.

My research is embodied in systems: interfaces, ontologies, processing frameworks, components. Science and engineering, art and design, the creative and the systematic, development and evaluation. The goal is nothing short of transforming the relations between human and machine to be more joyful, to shift the balance of power in this equation in favor of the sensitivities that characterize what it means to be human.

My teaching also connects theory and practice. I involve students in processes of asking questions, as well as answering them. Methodologies are connected in the border zone of interface analysis and synthesis. Human values are emphasized in the context of science and engineering. Creative process and the expression of individuals and groups are fostered.

I have also worked extensively with integrated media performance, music composition, and audio recording. Some of my work with sound can be found here.